Best Amsterdam Coffee Shops 2010

A good way to do a visual valuation is to watch the day to day operations and actually count the customers daily, foot and vehicle traffic over at least a month’s time. Yes, count. Sit inside the store but don’t be obvious. Observe and count! You will become a ‘regular’. This will also give you the opportunity to not only see the customer flow but also get an approximate of what the actual sales are. Sit close enough to hear what customers order and keep a generic tally. That will give you a little more vision of what IS reality.

Sincerity/Coffee Cards are a great idea for improving your sum of positive karma in the world. These aren’t actually about getting business. If you send the cards with nothing other than you truly want it will pay off. Also when I have free time during the day I’ll stop at a coffee shop and write a few. People you connect with will appreciate that you mad the effort to reach out.

Two of these titles are sufficiently interesting that I want to buy them. I pull up the menu on the reader and add them to my shopping cart. When I’m done browsing, I hit the purchase button. According to the displayed information, one of the books is in the store and will be waiting for me at the main counter. The other book isn’t available in the store, but it is in the warehouse. I can get it for a 10% discount. Would I like to buy it and have it mailed directly to me? Sure, I would!

Set Speaking Sub-goals. A speaking event should also be a learning experience for you, the speaker. One major goal is of course, to please, motivate, educate and move the audience. Try some new things, take some risks and make sure YOU learn from the event.

Half way through a business trip, I’ve just left Amsterdam after yet another couple day “field research” trip – one of a number I’ve made to the City of All Delights over the last few years. I’ve had the opportunity to do research in many cities I’ve been to over the years, but probably none as in depth as the beautiful home of Van Gogh. It’s a city full of canals and houseboats, bicycles, tulips and souvenir wooden shoes. Old men playing chess in the plaza with 2′ tall Kings. Museums. Parks. Windmills. Prostitutes. Water taxis and trolleys.

Teachers spend their own money on their classroom–and spend it often. This year, try giving a gift to the class you know the teacher will appreciate as well. A pack of pencils, a few extra folders, or even some treats for the goody jar are all simple, inexpensive ways to show your thoughtfulness. The items themselves need not be expensive or large in volume. The gift is not only the supplies you’re giving but the time you’ll save the teacher when she doesn’t have to run out and replenish the classroom’s coffer.

Just like the rest of us, teachers have their quirks, hobbies, and special interests. A gift that appeals to these individual likes is often a pleasant surprise. One teacher who is a fan of the Broadway show Wicked still talks about her Glinda-themed note cards given by a very observant and thoughtful third grader. Another who loves to bake bread was touched by a personalized recipe book picked out by a seven year old. Neither of these teachers ever made their interests explicitly known, but the children had picked up on the all the same. This made the gifts even more special.

Take note of what you did to get into your financial mess in the first place. If you are trying to fix your credit and have spent considerable time doing so, let that be a beacon for you not to get in that kind of mess again. If you have been overworked and underpaid, remember that when you negotiate salary terms for your next position. Learning any personal finance lesson can make or save you money in the future. Take the lessons you have learned and apply them to your finances in the future, giving you an advantage moving forward.